My Onkyo TX-NR5007 review

My Onkyo TX-NR5007 review

Whenever Onkyo releases a new high-end receiver, people always notice. Besides being the first to release new features, they launch these features for products priced far below those of competitors.

The most spectacular feature of the Onkyo TX-NR5007 is its sound quality. Gone are the days of Onkyo’s sound that swayed in favour of the over-powered and unbalanced driving bass. The TX-NR5007 is not bad if you plan on watching some high adrenaline movies — or simply want to recreate a movie theater experience.

The TX-NR5007 improved upon its old sound, and now provides higher resolution audio with significantly more realistic auditory precision and a larger spectrum of audible frequencies. The bass is heavy and deep without being too overpowering, the mid-range has extremely rich detail and is very broad, and the high-range is crisp and sophisticated. This tonal balance will amaze many regardless of volume setting, in which case it seems only right that it be turned a decent way up.

From easy-going Disney movies to action-packed movies, this is the overall best receiver to date. This is before I’ve even discussed its new features.

At the top of the list is the amplification across nine channels. Not only can this be easily configured to act as a multi-room system (for example, 5.1 and 2 stereo zones), it can also be bi-amped or bridged for a better audio experience.

The power of these channels is realized when joined to Onkyo’s Audyssey DSX and Pro-Logic IIz, because this AVR supports 7.1 while powering height/width channels. It also can be set up as a 5.1 with height or width channels. However, you will lose the rear channels, and unfortunately, Onkyo does not offer a 7.1 setup with height/width (i.e. 11.1). Denon’s AVR 4810 offers this ability and in that regard, has a one up on Onkyo.

But thankfully, the Onkyo TX-NR5007 has more to offer than just numerous channels. It offers 32 bits. The main processor runs on three 32-bit chipsets while 32-bit DACs turn the processed data from each channel to precise analogue sounds.

The improved technology transfers into the visual end, with a Reon-VX engine and great ISF calibration for all input sources. With the help of a shy-feed, it boosts the quality of standard definition shows to a stunning 1080p.

As far as processing is concerned, Onkyo covered all bases with the use of DTS and Dolby (includes Dolby volume). The NR5007 also has auto MultEQ set up, room EQ, Audyssey gamut, and Dynamic Volume. Its Dynamic EQ corrects room EQ to match the volume and range of sound.

The GUI features almost instinctive ease with which it can be used. So that’s a definite plus. Onkyo has achieved true excellence with the TX-NR5007′s interface. It is bold, logical, and, maybe best of all, provides easy-to-understand descriptions of all its features, functions and settings. It is without a doubt the best GUI on any top-brand receiver and practically condemns its rather large manual to the recycling bin.

With all of these advantages exceeding those of the TX-NR5007′s competitors, you’ve got to wonder how this receiver manages to be about $1200 cheaper than its nearest rival. The answer lies in its exterior.

Those are the pros. The aren’t many cons of the TX-NR5007, but it does not have a second remote for different zones and has no Wi-Fi capabilities. Its overall body quality is also somewhat lacking for a receiver of its caliber.

Despite all of this, the Onkyo TX-NR5007 boasts some amazing features, and will save you over $1000 for an AVR of the same quality.