Q: My wish came true in a dream. What does it mean?

Q: My wish came true in a dream. What does it mean?

Asked by Robert and others


Karen’s thoughts:

Wish fulfilment dreams are often the most easy to interpret. What these dreams often reflect is a strong desire in the dreamer for something they can’t have in their waking lives. Robert from Germany was bold enough to send me an e-mail of his dream which (although heavily edited by me) is a wonderful example of a wish coming true in a dream.

“In my dream, I am ill in hospital and I wake to see a nurse’s kindly face watching over me. She takes my temperature and blood pressure and tells me not to worry anymore. I am in good hands. I notice that her uniform is short and she is wearing black stockings. I like her legs and I feel sexually attracted to her. She feeds me grapes and then asks if I want a bed-bath. Then she gets into bed with me…”

The nurse, as well as being a kindly, womanly figure — someone to look after him and take care of his every need — also satisfies his hunger in other directions.

Personality in opposite

It is not unusual for a poor man to dream of living in a mansion and enjoy a life of luxury, or for the office junior to dream of being the boss. In another e-mail, Umberto asked:

“I am generally shy in company and it takes me a long time to make friends. Why did I dream that I was performing in a pantomime of all things?”

Often, dreams compensate for aspects of the personality which we might feel we lack. In this case, the dream over-compensates — for it is unlikely the dreamer would ever wish to perform in a pantomime.

Annette wrote:

“My husband has been very ill due to his heart. We have not slept in the same room for nearly six months. I love him very much but sometimes, at night, I do feel lonely. I am disturbed that sometimes in my dreams I see myself with a man I work with. We are making mad passionate love and so far this has been under a table in the office where I work, in a cave, in a lift and in a barn in the middle of the countryside. This man is happily married and the incredible thing is, I don’t even fancy him. Why am I having such lurid dreams?

And why shouldn’t she? Dreams compensate for what is missing from waking life, and these dreams fulfil a need within the dreamer. There is safety in the fact that she isn’t attracted to the man concerned because in real life, there would be no temptation to turn these dreams into reality. They’re just a harmless way of feeding an unconscious need while remaining faithful to her husband.

And feeding needs seems to be a common theme in these types of dreams when another example was sent to me by Kimberly from Utah. She is on a diet and is proud of the weight she has so far lost. However, in her dream, “I seemed to have stepped back in time. I was at a mediaeval banquet. The table was groaning under the weight of all the food and I really made a pig of myself, tasting everything that was on offer.” Although no specific food was mentioned in the above dream, it is interesting to note some of the meanings traditionally given to different types of food in dreams. Here are a few:

Red apples are symbolic of happy friendships and true love, while green apples suggest possible disappointment in love.

Cherries are symbolic of good health and fertility. Grapes, of financial success. Pears suggest possible illness, prunes indicate good health. Tomatoes signify possible short-term happiness and both potatoes and peas are symbolic of career success and profits.

Carrots hint at a forthcoming marriage and rice suggests pleasing friendships. Cheese is indication of sorrow and disappointment, while parsnips suggest career success but misfortune in love.